This week’s special guest is Russell Carleton, Baseball Prospectus writer and frequent Effectively Wild guest. He joins Ryan Sullivan, to offer his insights on the effects of “the grind,” the value of managers, clubhouse chemistry, drug/alcohol addiction in baseball, and advocating for women in sportswriting. This episode does not contain #GoryMath.

The Philadelphia Phillies will open their 2015 season with a bold, necessary plan.

As soon as starting pitcher Cole Hamels realized what was happening, he began looking for the exits. Winning, he announced, is “not going to happen here.” He continued: “This isn’t what I expected. It’s not what the Phillies expected, either. But it’s reality.”

As the ever so affectionate Tyrion Lannister once said, “Turns out far too much has been written about great men and not nearly enough about morons.” Now, the Cleveland Spiders weren’t necessarily morons, but you… Read more »

The Society for American Baseball Research (“SABR”) recently announced the finalists for its 2015 Analytics Conference Research Awards, which “recognize baseball researchers who have completed the best work of original analysis or commentary during the… Read more »

My favorite baseball movie of all time is The Natural. Go ahead, mock me.

I love it for all that is pure fantasy: whittling Wonderboy from a lightning-split tree, whiffing The Whammer, inexplicable shooting by a crazy woman, busted open balls, deadly outfield walls, exploding clocks in Wrigley, Glenn Close sold as attractive, a shadow lurking owner, Wilford Brimley being tangentially related to Kim Basinger, and of course… the bloody hero’s fireworks display.

I found something peculiar while researching the career performance of those likely first-ballot Hall of Famers – Randy Johnson, Pedro Martinez and John Smoltz. One player who will certainly not be a Hall of Famer, who was very familiar to me as Mets fan with my formative years in the late 1990’s to early 2000’s, kept appearing. It was none other than Pat Mahomes.

“The transition from player to coach is often a difficult one with numerous components factoring into a successful move from the playing field to the dugout and backfields. For many, the passion and drive to perform on the field are still present, but the body sometimes breaks down and an eroding skillset often betrays the player. Becoming a good coach won’t happen until one is able to put their playing days in the rearview mirror.”